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Apr
26
12:00 AM00:00

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Common Blue Violet (Viola sororia). While violets are often frowned upon as “weeds” when found in lawns, they are in fact the host plant for a large class of butterflies known as fritillaries, whose 30 or so species will only lay their eggs where there are violets for their larva to feed on. Contrary to its name, this type of violet may be any shade of blue, ranging from purple to white. The bright petals, ultraviolet veins, and sometimes even the scent of the flowers attract many other flying insects, particularly bees. In fact, the mining bee (Andrena violae), a specialist pollinator that's common in our neck of the woods, only visits violets. --Patty Crane

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Apr
28
12:00 AM00:00

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Trout-lily (Erythronium americanum). This small lily’s name comes from its splotchy leaves, which are thought to resemble the mottled brook-trout. Surely you've seen them carpeting the forest floor on your earliest walks in the spring. Have you ever wondered why you see so many more of their leaves than their flowers? I have! And I recently learned why: only one percent of trout lilies produce a flower in any given year. Which makes them all the more special. Their tubular blossoms attract longer tongued insects like queen bumblebees and certain beetles. Like many spring wildflowers, their downward-pointing flowers close at night and on cloudy days when pollinators aren’t likely to be active.   --Patty Crane

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May
10
6:00 PM18:00

WINDSOR CRAFT NIGHT: Stained Glass Wall Hanging!

Town Hall
Come make your own 8" x 10" indoor/outdoor stained glass wall hanging! You paint and create your own design on a frame. This event requires a $10.00 non-refundable deposit by April 17th. Please send checks along with your NAME, PHONE NUMBER, & EMAIL ADDRESS to Ann Koczela (550 E. Windsor Road, Windsor, MA 01270). Any questions: call #684-4727. All materials are included. This event is generously sponsored by the Windsor Cultural Council.

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Apr
23
12:00 AM00:00

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Blue Orchard Mason Bee (Osmia lignaria). Mason bees are solitary. Instead of having a queen and worker bees, each one tends to its own brood. And the favorite food for their brood is fruit tree pollen. Mixed with nectar and their own saliva, the bees knead the pollen into a mass, lay a single egg on top, then seal the egg its own chamber until there are five to eight chambers, each with food and one egg. By the end of summer, the larvae metamorphose into pupae and then adults, which remain safe in the nest until the following spring. The new generation will emerge just in time for the blooming apple trees!  --Patty Crane

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Apr
22
1:00 PM13:00

Kids' Earth Day Walk

Notchview
A self-guided hike along our new Woodland Walk for kids!  This short hike starts at the old concrete steps that once formed the property's allee and takes you into Notchview's forest and up to "Spruce Hill." From there, make your way back through the rhododendron "den."  A fun and enchanting walk for kids of all ages! FREE. Contact: 413.684.0148
notchview@thetrustees.org

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Apr
22
11:00 AM11:00

Earth Day: Build Your Own Bee Hotel!

Town Park, Peru Rd
As part of Windsor’s Earth Day festivities (and back by popular demand!), Friends of Windsor will be hosting another bee hotel-building workshop to help our Windsor pollinators. For kids of all ages! This time we’ll be at the Town Park, where all the Earth Day action is, so dress according to the weather. And if you can, please bring your own waterproof container, preferably a half-gallon milk carton (wax or plastic). We’ll provide the rest. You’ll go home with a Bee Hotel and we’ll suggest the best places to locate it in your garden. For any questions, please call or email Val Kohn: 684-1731, valckohn@verizon.net.

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Apr
22
8:00 AM08:00

Earth Day: Town Park Clean-Up Party!

Town Park, Peru Rd
In conjunction with the pollinator project the Parks and Rec Committee is proposing a small pollinator garden at the Town Park and plantings around the memorial at the Town Hall. Come help us kick things off with a clean-up party to celebrate Earth Day! Volunteers are welcome in the morning with chainsaws to clear up near the garden and towards the afternoon to help prep the planting area. See the list of volunteer needs below. Lunch will be provided! Please RSVP so we have enough food: either call 860-965-6594 or email kadiskadis@yahoo.com.

 We need volunteers who can:
- run a chainsaw (2 people)
- assist with moving brush

- rake, dig, edge, prepare garden bed
- work with loppers
- cook and serve food
- make sure everyone is hydrated!

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Apr
20
12:00 PM12:00

Kick Off: Community Read!

Windsor Town Library
A community read encourages members of a community, whether it be a grade, school, town, or city, to read a single title simultaneously and freely discuss the concepts and content of that book. In light of our community's 2018 initiative to celebrate and protect pollinators, we'll be reading "The Forgotten Pollinators" by Stephen Buchman and Gary Nabhan. The book offers an entertaining account of the authors' worldwide travels studying pollinators, showing the larger picture of a fragile ecosystem through the eyes of some of its more unnoticed inhabitants. They share their predictions for the future, as well as recommendations for protecting pollinators and their habitats. Books will be available at the library beginning April 20th. The read will run until May 20th.  Please join us in reading this fascinating book with great conversations to follow! This is a FREE event.

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Apr
18
12:00 AM00:00

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Question Mark (Polygonia interrogationis). This is the largest of what are known as anglewing butterflies. Its name comes from the small, light-colored 'question mark' that can be seen on the underside of its hindwing. The gorgeous adults (deceptively plain-looking when their wings are folded) overwinter and can now be found searching for carrion, winter-rotten fruit, animal scat, and nutrients found in puddles. They rarely seek out flowers! But in their caterpillar form Question Marks require a host plant to feed on, and not just any plant will do. They seek out American and red elms, hackberry, certain hops, and nettles. Yet more proof of the critical relationship between native insects and plants.  –-Patty Crane

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Apr
15
12:00 AM00:00

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Bloodroot (Sanguinaria canadensis). This early spring wildflower, a member of the poppy family, doesn't offer any nectar to feed its visiting insects, but it's a very important source of pollen for bees—especially mining bees—to raise their broods. The white flowers appear before the leaves, and to increase the odds of being pollinated, the pollen-laden anthers curve down toward the outside of the flower where they're more accessible. Amazingly, if insect pollination doesn't take place by the third day, the (male) anthers curve back inward and self-pollinate with their own (female) stigma! If you scratch the root, you'll understand how it got its name. Ants love bloodroot's oil-rich seeds and, by carrying them to their nests, help the plant spread throughout the woods.  --Patty Crane

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Apr
14
12:00 AM00:00

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Marsh Marigold (Caltha palustris). Look for their bright yellow flowers in wet pastures and roadside ditches. These lovely blossoms attract beneficial pollinating flies and bees, and their seeds are eaten specifically by Wood Ducks, as well as other game birds and rodents. Marsh marigolds are believed to be an ancient species that's existed since before the last Ice Age. No wonder they can tough out April in Windsor! Apparently, the name "marigold" originated as “Mary Gold,” in reference to the medieval times where it was displayed in churches during Easter as a tribute to the Virgin Mary.  --Patty Crane

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Apr
12
12:00 AM00:00

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Blue Orchard Mason Bee (Osmia lignaria). Native bees like the mason bee are better pollinators of native crops than honeybees, especially when it comes to pollinating fruit trees. They’re about the same size as a honeybee but are a dark metallic blue, rather than the tell-tale striped orange & brown. Mason bees carry pollen on their bellies rather than their hind legs and they nest in holes, using clay to make partitions and seal the entrance (thus earning their designation as “masons”). The blue orchard bee season is early spring. Once they emerge they promptly mate, search for empty holes that are the right size and shape, and then go to work stocking their nests with the pollen that will feed their brood. ---Patty Crane

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Apr
7
7:30 PM19:30

Windsor Players: Black Comedy

Windsor Town Hall
Lovesick and desperate, sculptor Brindsley Miller has embellished his apartment with furniture and objects d’arte “borrowed” from the absent antique collector next-door, hoping to impress his fiancée’s pompous father and a wealthy art dealer. The fussy neighbor, Harold Gorringe, returns just as a blown fuse plunges the apartment into darkness and Brindsley is revealed. Unexpected guests, aging spinsters, errant phone cords, and other snares impede his frantic attempts to return the purloined items before light is restored. Cost: $10. You can purchase your tickets online at: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/black-comedy-tickets-44303360544. Tickets available at the door on a first come, first serve basis

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Apr
6
7:30 PM19:30

Windsor Players: Black Comedy

Windsor Town Hall
Lovesick and desperate, sculptor Brindsley Miller has embellished his apartment with furniture and objects d’arte “borrowed” from the absent antique collector next-door, hoping to impress his fiancée’s pompous father and a wealthy art dealer. The fussy neighbor, Harold Gorringe, returns just as a blown fuse plunges the apartment into darkness and Brindsley is revealed. Unexpected guests, aging spinsters, errant phone cords, and other snares impede his frantic attempts to return the purloined items before light is restored. Cost: $10. You can purchase your tickets online at: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/black-comedy-tickets-44303360544. Tickets available at the door on a first come, first serve basis

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Apr
4
12:00 AM00:00

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Hepatica (Anemone americana). As soon as the snow melts from the bases of trees, hepatica will flower in clusters of white, pink, or purple flowers surrounded by leathery three-lobed leaves. The delicate flowers seem almost too fragile to endure April’s harsh weather. The name “hepatica” comes from the Greek word for liver. Back in the old days, doctors thought that because hepatica’s leaves looked like a human liver, the plant would cure liver ailments. While that was clearly a big imaginative leap, encountering these beauties after a long, snowy winter might just cure the old house-bound blues!   --Patty Crane

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Apr
2
12:00 AM00:00

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Coltsfoot (Tussilago farfara). Often mistaken for dandelions, these wildflowers are important for early spring pollinators. They provide an abundant source of pollen and nectar at a time when both are scarce. The hoof-shaped leaves don’t emerge until after the flowers have gone by. Coltsfoot and dandelions are in the same family, but there’s a distinct difference. The petals of a dandelion are flat (rays), and it has a smooth stem. Coltsfoot has tubular petals (disks) surrounded by flat rays, and its hairy stem is thick and scaly. These two different flower structures make Coltsfoot attractive to a wider variety of pollinators. Look for these bright signs of spring on the sides of roads, and in disturbed areas. –Patty Crane

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Mar
29
12:00 AM00:00

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Blue jays may be one of the most visible birds at this time of year, but they're far from ordinary. Did you know they're actually not blue? Their feathers are pigmented brown, but are structured in such a way that light scattering off them causes us to see the blue color spectrum. Although they have a reputation for robbing eggs from the nests of other birds, they mainly stick to their usual omnivorous fare that includes berries, acorns, and more. The egg-eating behavior is rare. --Patty Crane

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