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May
28
12:00 AM00:00

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Baltimore Checkerspot caterpillar - During the summer, the female Baltimore Checkerspot butterfly lays abundant clusters of eggs on a host plant (often Turtlehead or Chelonia). When the eggs hatch the following May, each larva will feed on the plant until some time in August. Then, it spins its web on the ground and spends the winter all tucked in. Come spring, the larva feed on the host plant again until they pupate, emerging in its gorgeous butterfly form around mid-July, and the cycle continues. The caterpillar’s bristly texture is a defense mechanism to deter predators. —Patty Crane

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May
31
12:00 AM00:00

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Eastern Tiger Swallowtail butterfly - These beauties spend the winter in their chrysalis form, not emerging until May or June when there are sufficient numbers of blooming flowers to provide the nectar they rely on for food. They like nectar from a variety of plants including butterfly bush, milkweed, phlox, lilac, and wild cherry. Their larvae eat the leaves of a variety of woody plants including wild cherry, birch, ash, cottonwood, and willow. We can help pollinators like the Eastern Tiger Swallowtail by planting the flowers they love and need. —Patty Crane

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Jun
2
10:00 AM10:00

Plant, Tree & Wild Edibles at Tamarack Hollow

Tamarack Hollow Nature & Cultural Center
Learn about plants, trees and wild edibles that grow in the unique high elevation spruce-fir boreal forests of western MA such as blue bead lily, pink lady slipper, painted trillium, wild azalea, bunchberry, woodland ferns and trees such as red spruce, balsam fir and tamarack. To register or for more info, email: aimee@gaiaroots.com

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Jun
2
7:00 PM19:00

Friday (well, Saturday) Night Cafe!

Cummington Village Church
Thanks to a local Cultural Council grant, this great ongoing series features local musicians. One Part Luck - Peg Cowen and John Bye from Cummington and friends - release their new CD this evening (note the rare Saturday timing!). All are welcome. Snacks served, BYO.

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Jun
3
12:00 AM00:00

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Ruby-throated Hummingbird
“Hummers” need a lot of food (nectar, that is) to keep their high-speed engines running. Their long bills are perfectly designed to reach the nectar in the throats of blossoms such as wild columbine, bee balm (bergamot), cardinal flower, and jewelweed. During the act of feeding, the pollen that sticks to the feathers around their bill and face is carried from flower to flower. —Patty Crane

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Jun
6
12:00 AM00:00

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Wild Columbine (Aquilegia canadensis)
This native wildflower, which blooms throughout the spring, is very attractive to hummingbirds, butterflies, and other long-tongued insects. And it makes a great native garden plant! Its genus name (Aquilegia) comes from the Latin word for eagle, and relates to the flower’s talon-shaped nectar-holding spurs. —Patty Crane

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Jun
8
7:00 PM19:00

Friday Night Cafe!

Cummington Village Church
Thanks to a local Cultural Council grant, this great ongoing Friday night series features local musicians. As a finale to this season, tonight we’ll have an all-star lineup of folks who played throughout the year with a celebration of the music of 1968. All are welcome. Snacks served, BYO.

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Jun
9
9:00 AM09:00

Windsor Church Tag & Bake Sales

Windsor Town Hall
This annual tag sale is one of our major fund raisers to help run the church. Please consider donating any good, usable items that you no longer need (eg clothing, books, furniture and household items- no major appliances or electronics please).  Drop off dates are Wednesday June 6th through Friday the 9th at the church. Please also consider baking for this event.  Your home-baked items can be dropped off on Saturday morning the day of the sale. Come find some great treasures and satisfy your sweet tooth!  We thank the community in advance for all your continued support, donations and shopping! 

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Jun
9
6:00 PM18:00

Native Beekeeping: Economics, Ecology, & the Plight of Our Native Bees

Notchview Visitor’s Center
In collaboration with Friends of Windsor and the community-wide effort to protect local pollinators, come join us for a talk by Dr. Robert Gegear on native bees! This FREE event will be followed by wine & cheese in the lodge! Here’s why you should come:

Pollinators are declining at an unprecedented rate worldwide due to human-induced rapid environmental change. These declines pose a significant threat to our food supply and consequently, there has been major focus on the development and implementation of conservation strategies aimed to increase pollinator abundance in agricultural areas. However, the ecological needs of 98% of wild pollinator species are not considered in such strategies because they do not play a major role in crop pollination. Without these ‘keystone’ wild pollinator species, we would lose most of our native flowering plants and the animals that use them for food, shelter and nesting sites, eventually causing ecosystems to collapse. Please join Dr. Robert J. Gegear for a discussion on what you can do to help preserve our native pollinator diversity and assess the ecological ‘friendliness’ of pollinator habitat at any spatial scale.

About our speaker: Dr. Robert J. Gegear has been studying the neuroecology and conservation of pollinator-plant systems native to North America for almost 30 years. He is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Biology and Biotechnology at WPI and Director of the New England Beecology Research Program, which aims to use citizen scientists in order to collect large amounts of ecological data on bumblebees and the plants that they pollinate across the state. His efforts are already greatly accelerating the development of effective conservation and restoration strategies for threatened bumblebee species in Eastern North America.

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Jun
10
9:00 AM09:00

Town Pollinator Planting Day!

Town Park & Town Hall
All are welcome to help in the next step of our pollinator garden project, planting day! Come help us get these plants in the ground! We will be working at two locations; the Town Park on Peru Road and at the Town Hall on Rt. 9. Please RSVP to kadiskadis@yahoo.com so we can be sure to have food for you. Let me know if you have any dietary requests. If you can’t make it that day, but still want to participate in this project, we are looking for a few people to water weekly until the plants get established. Many thanks to everyone who has already helped make this project a reality! –Barbara Connors

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Jun
10
11:00 AM11:00

Community Plant Sale & Market!

Windsor Historical Museum
In conjunction with the community-wide pollinator initiative and overlapping with the Town Pollinator Planting Day, plant and vegetable vendors (along with a variety of others!) will be setup outside the Historical Museum. Come buy pollinator-friendly native plants for your gardens—or, if you’re inclined, to donate to the community garden project. All plants will be native and grown free of pesticides, especially neonicitinoids.

 

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Jun
13
7:00 PM19:00

Community Read Discussion: The Forgotten Pollinators

Windsor Town Hall

We'll be discussing our Community Read book, "The Forgotten Pollinators" by Stephen Buchman and Gary Nabhan. The book offers an entertaining account of the authors' worldwide travels studying pollinators, showing the larger picture of a fragile ecosystem through the eyes of some of its more unnoticed inhabitants. They share their predictions for the future, as well as recommendations for protecting pollinators and their habitats. Come join the conversation, even if you haven’t finished the book yet (or if you’re thinking of reading it).

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Jun
14
12:00 AM00:00

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Galium Sphinx Moth
These large moths are amazing flyers, capable of hovering in flight like hummingbirds (which they’re sometimes mistaken for). They’re day-flying, or diurnal, moths that preferably feed on Rough Bedstraw (Galium asprellum). They feed using their proboscis, a coiled tube that they unfurl and probe deeply into flowers for nectar. —Patty Crane

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Jun
16
12:00 AM00:00

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Bunchberry (Cornus canadensis)
This lovely plant is sometimes called dwarf dogwood because it’s the smallest member of the Dogwood family. Those striking white petals aren’t petals at all, but leaves (known as bracts) that surround numerous tiny flowers. Each of these flowers has a bristly filament that, when triggered by an insect, releases pollen so explosively that it takes a camera shooting 10,000 frames per second to catch the action! Once pollinated—most often by bumblebees, solitary bees, beeflies, and syrphid flies—the flowers turn into bright red berry-like fruits that are favored by several species of birds, including veeries, vireos, and spruce grouse. It can be found in moist woods with acidic soils. —Patty Crane

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Jun
17
12:00 AM00:00

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Monarch Butterfly
So much can be said about this striking and impressive butterfly. They’re one of the few insects capable of making trans-Atlantic crossings, and have the ability to travel between 50-100 miles per day. Monarchs only lay their eggs on milkweed leaves, as that’s the only plant their larva will eat. This is why it’s so important to ensure the health of Windsor’s milkweed crop. Cool fact: the poisonous milkweed concentrates in the caterpillar’s body so that predators avoid eating them. —Patty Crane

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Jun
20
12:00 AM00:00

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Sweat Bees
Sweat bees are native, solitary bees, and busy pollinators. Their name comes from their attraction to human perspiration. These small, fuzzy bees present in several colors, but many are an unmistakable metallic green. They nest in the ground or in wood.

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Jun
25
12:00 AM00:00

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Common Eastern Bumblebee (Bombus)
These social bees are squat, fuzzy, and yellow and black. Their nest site is typically on or under ground. Their workers, which hatch early, gather nectar and pollen, make honey, and tend to the nest and young. Late summer, drones and queens hatch and mate. Most of colony dies off once the weather turns cold, but the queens tuck into the leaf litter to overwinter.

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Jun
28
12:00 AM00:00

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Spicebush Swallowtail
The caterpillars of these butterflies like to feed on the woody plant Spicebush, hence their name. One of many butterflies that has eyes along its back to confuse predators, it is most often found in open woodlands, and near the wooded edges of fields and meadows during two periods of the summer: from mid May through late June and early July through late August. Their caterpillar form is magnificent. —Patty Crane

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Jun
30
12:00 AM00:00

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Buttercup
Insect pollinators see colors differently than we do because they are sensitive to ultraviolet (UV) light, which makes the reproductive areas of some flowers stand out. To human eyes a buttercup appears as a uniform yellow, but to a bee’s eyes the flowers center (where the reproductive structures are) is darker because it reflects UV light. —from Mary Holland’s Naturally Curious

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May
26
12:00 AM00:00

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Clintonia - If this plant reminds you of a lily (I’m thinking Lily of the Valley here), then you’re onto something. It does belong to the Lily family. If pollinated, each of its four delicate yellow flowers per stem develops into a bright blue berry-like fruit. Hence its other moniker: Blue Bead Lily. Clintonia prefers acid soil in damp woods, and you’re likely to find it growing in the vicinity of red trillium, striped maple, indian cucumber, and hobblebush. —Patty Crane

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May
25
7:00 PM19:00

Friday Night Cafe!

Cummington Village Church
Thanks to a local Cultural Council grant, this great ongoing Friday night series features local musicians. We have a lot of talent in these hills, including Windsor’s own Jack Swindlehurst, who’ll be playing this evening. All are welcome. Snacks served, BYO.

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May
23
12:00 AM00:00

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Painted Trillium - The blaze of crimson at the center of such a pure white flower gives this beauty a formal, elegant look. It almost seems out of place in the boggy, acidic woods where it prefers to grow. Like its cousin, Red Trillium, it has an unpleasant odor—to us, NOT to pollinators—but Red Trillium wins the stink prize hands-down! Over the course of the summer, each pollinated blossom develops into a single bright red berry-like fruit. Ants love the oil-rich structure attached to the seed and, by carrying them off to their tunnels, help disperse Painted Trillium throughout the woods. —Patty Crane

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May
20
12:00 AM00:00

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Spring Azure butterfly - This photo doesn’t do the lovely powdery-blue wings justice, but when you see one you’ll know it. This little butterfly frequents woodlands, open fields, gardens and even roadsides. Females often deposit their eggs on the flower buds of shrubs such as dogwood, viburnum, and blueberry. Males often congregate in shallow puddles and damp areas along streams and ditches. Keep an eye out for them! —Patty Crane

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May
17
12:00 AM00:00

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American Copper butterfly - This butterfly can most often be found in abandoned fields, power line cuts, railroad tracks, and similar disturbed areas, probably because this is where its preferred (but non-native) host plant, Sheep Sorrel, appears. When resting with wings flat, its bright orange color catches your eye, but the undersides are largely a dull whitish-gray. It likes to fly about 1-2 feet above the ground, and doesn’t hover in the air for long. Males are known to set up small territories and defend them vigorously, chasing away anything that comes their way….including shadows! —Patty Crane

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May
13
2:00 PM14:00

PM Seating: Mother's Day Tea

William Cullen Bryant Homestead
Relive the elegance and charm of the past with Mom on Mothers' Day! Enjoy a proper afternoon tea with all of the refinement and delight of Bryant's era in the beautiful parlor of this Victorian home! Pastries, scones, sandwiches and tea served on beautiful china along with tours of the historic house and Bryant's poetry read aloud in the library. An unforgettable Mothers' Day gift and experience.  Children under the age of 6 are FREE. Member Adult: $28;
Member Child: $14; Nonmember Adult: $35; Nonmember Child: $18. Please register as follows:
Morning Seating (11:00am - 1:00pm): REGISTER
Afternoon Seating (2:00pm - 4:00pm): REGISTER
Contact: 413.532.1631 x3110 or acaluori@thetrustees.org

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May
13
11:00 AM11:00

AM Seating: Mother's Day Tea

William Cullen Bryant Homestead
Relive the elegance and charm of the past with Mom on Mothers' Day! Enjoy a proper afternoon tea with all of the refinement and delight of Bryant's era in the beautiful parlor of this Victorian home! Pastries, scones, sandwiches and tea served on beautiful china along with tours of the historic house and Bryant's poetry read aloud in the library. An unforgettable Mothers' Day gift and experience.  Children under the age of 6 are FREE. Member Adult: $28;
Member Child: $14; Nonmember Adult: $35; Nonmember Child: $18. Please register as follows:
Morning Seating (11:00am - 1:00pm): REGISTER
Afternoon Seating (2:00pm - 4:00pm): REGISTER
Contact: 413.532.1631 x3110 or acaluori@thetrustees.org

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May
12
12:00 AM00:00

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Blue-eyed Grass - This dainty blue-violet flower can be found most commonly hiding in meadows and pastures. Although it has stiff, grass-like leaves and a wiry stem, it’s not actually a grass (neither are its 7 other northeastern species), but a member of the Iris family. Each of the 6 petals, tipped with a bristly point, has thin dark lines running its length, which may be what draws pollinators to the gold center. Take a good look and tell me you wouldn’t be drawn into that brightness, too! And it’s no wonder: each flower last no longer than a day. —Patty Crane

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May
6
1:00 PM13:00

Tamarack Hollow's MAY FEST in Easthampton

Mass Audubon Arcadia Wildlife Sanctuary, Easthampton, MA
w/ LIVE music by the Iroko Nuevo Cuban Drum & Dance Ensemble & the Valley Rhythm Keepers + guided hike, nature craft activities, world marketplace, Boreal forest slideshow, chili lunch, silent auction & more! Family friendly event! All proceeds to benefit the Tamarack Hollow Nature & Cultural Center in Windsor, MA. Visit our website & facebook for more info and to purchase tickets / make donations! www.tamarackhollownatureandculturalcenter.org

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May
5
1:00 PM13:00

PM Session: Kids Meet the (Goat) Kids & Cheese Tasting!

Notchview
Come meet Notchview's newest residents: our baby goats! A fun way for kids to learn about these fascinating farm animals and a little bit about Notchview's history as a once upon a time farm estate. There's fun for adults, too: A Cheese Tasting! We'll have different locally produced goat cheeses to try out in the lodge afterwards. Member Adult: $5; Member Child: $3; Nonmember Adult: $10; Nonmember Child: $6. Registration is required as there are a limited number of spots per timeslot:
Morning Session (10:00am) REGISTER HERE
Afternoon Session (1:00pm) REGISTER HERE
Contact Information: 413.684.0148 or acaluori@thetrustees.org

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May
5
10:00 AM10:00

AM Session: Kids Meet the (Goat) Kids & Cheese Tasting!

Notchview
Come meet Notchview's newest residents: our baby goats! A fun way for kids to learn about these fascinating farm animals and a little bit about Notchview's history as a once upon a time farm estate. There's fun for adults, too: A Cheese Tasting! We'll have different locally produced goat cheeses to try out in the lodge afterwards. Member Adult: $5; Member Child: $3; Nonmember Adult: $10; Nonmember Child: $6. Registration is required as there are a limited number of spots per timeslot:
Morning Session (10:00am) REGISTER HERE
Afternoon Session (1:00pm) REGISTER HERE
Contact Information: 413.684.0148 or acaluori@thetrustees.org

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